Friday, September 14, 2007

Compact Members

So far, these people have pledged to go consumption-free for the month:

Anila Muhammad
Salaams!

Great idea Sanjana and I am more than happy to reduce my consumption to essentials. About three years back I participated in a similar project and through self-reflection learned a great deal about myself, my values, and about the sustainability of this planet.

I am looking forward to hearing about everyone's experiences during this month of reduced consumption.

A bit about me. I currently teach undergraduate courses in the Women's Studies program at IUPUI (Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis). Recently launched ecoIslam.org, a blog dedicated to focusing on the solutions to environmental challenges. And have been involved in volunteer grassroots efforts in animal rescue, animal advocacy, and forest stewardship.

Happy Fasting!

Asma Rehman

Dina Badawy
Salam! I'm Dina Badawy and I currently live in San Francisco, CA. I just moved here from DC, the place that I credit to making me much more politically and environmentally aware. It was a part-time job at Earth Day Network that got me to learn more about the environment, and more importantly, my impact on it. I came across this compact near the end of Ramadan (by google-ing "muslim and environment," how awesome), but figured these habits/behaviors would be good to learn and share at anytime of the year.

Faiza Ali

Inayet Sahin
Inayet Sahin is a homeschooling mom of 3 boys who is seeking a peaceful existance with Allah's creation. She has her masters in curriculum theory and development and is currently organizing the Going Organic and Green workshop to be held on Oct. 27th, 2007. She is also the developing the upcoming website, spiritualhomeschooling.com, which encompasses organic and green living.

Khadijeh Zarafshar
My name is Khadijeh, and I'm a senior at Georgetown University, studying English lit, Arabic, and Studio Art. I lived on M street this summer and walking past all the stores, at least twice a day, provided me a huge temptation, which I gave in to, a bit too frequently :) So I'm looking forward to this "exercise in simplicity," a means of re-focusing on the basics- the spiritual, family, and school aspects of life. I'm also trying to cut back on my internet usage this month. A few months ago, I picked up a copy of Vanity Fair's "Green Issue," which was eye-opening to say the least, and I love the concrete initiative the Ramadan Compact contains. Ramadan Mubarak!

Marwa El-Messidi
I currently live in Richmond, Virginia and work at a state government agency, the Department of Housing and Community Development. I decided to participate in the Ramadan compact in hopes to pull myself from as many worldly distractions as possible during this holy month. After reading about this project, I loved the idea.

I first became interested in being environmentally conscious while taking an Environmental Ethics course during my undergraduate years. This was a powerful course that truly opened my eyes to how mankind has neglected and mistreated the environment as well as how a simpler lifestyle leads to a more fulfilling life. One American Muslims scholar once said that "We need to be willing to say 'I will do with less/live with less as a means to have a more equitable world' " The Ramadan compact is an excellent way to raise consciousness about consumerism and our individual impact on the environment and is a great idea for an annual Ramadan resolution.

Mohamad Chakaki
Salaam! My name is Mohamad. I live and work in Washington, DC, my home-away-from-home... stirring things up here in the nation's capital, like any good social ecologist would, both socially and environmentally. I'm joining the compact for several reasons (social, environmental and economic) but mostly because I'm seeking clarity and focus in this blessed month. I pray this becomes an effort we can all extend well beyond Ramdan, insha'Allah!

Omaira Alam
I just completed a 3-year program in Washington, D.C. I'm almost back in my hometown of Toronto, but not quite (I keep doing these D.C. reappearances :)). I'm presently between jobs, between countries, and just trying to see which direction Allah want me to head in now. As for being part of this initiative that Sanjana has put together, I don't really consider myself a "green" person, but I don't like wasting things...In Toronto they alternate between collecting recycling and trash every two weeks, and they collect compost every week...but what if it wasn't the law, and something I had the option of doing. This is more an effort in self-reflection to see if I really am what I claim to be and an extension of what Ramadan is all about...as my mummy put it, we don't need all this surplus whether material or otherwise...

With dua, and tawfiq,
omaira.

Reem Abdelrazek
Salam! I'm Reem Abdelrazek, working in Nashville, Tennessee (residing spiritually in Knoxville). I decided to participate in the Ramadan Compact for several reasons. 1) Honestly, I'm low on funds and need to save money; 2) Why not give up 'consumerism' for a month? I've never tried anything like this before and it'll be interesting to see how well I fare; 3) Supporting Sanjana and her green ways; and 4) Instead of giving to myself in this blessed month, I should give to others. I wish you all the best. I must admit though...I did buy a book shelf yesterday :-\

Rehenuma Asmi
I'm joining this because I have always been a "tree hugger" as my brother calls it.. an eco nut who feels guilty if they don't collect everyones plastic bottles for recycling at those large parties people are always throwing and becomes extremely disappointed in mankind when there are no recycling stations in sight.. the environment and our fellow humans deserve a fair treatment when it comes to how we use our resources- its a true injustice that we are committing.. I like this focus because it really emphasizes the nature of the problem- not just basic recycling, but general over consumption and improper use of goods- we dont share and we don't seem to care if everyone has enough- our overconsumption should be directly linked to poverty, starvation and disease across the world.

I'm a doctoral student at Columbia Teachers College in the program of Anthropology and Education. I am married to wonderful man and have a beautiful 6 month old who at the rate she is transforming before my eyes will probably be 18 before I know it.

Rubina Siddiqui
Salaam! My name is Rubina, aka, Ruby. I'm from East Tennessee and have somehow found my way to the big city of DC... again. I've made this "Ramadan Compact" pledge for a number of reasons, the biggest being the fact that I don't need any more worldly distractions then I've already burdened myself with during this month. Besides, there are better things for your money to be spent on, right?

Sanjana Ahmad
Although Ramadan officially began on Wednesday night for most of us, my pledge did not start until 2pm Thursday afternoon. There was a pair of pants that I simply HAD to buy (I need clothes for my new job!) and a rolling pin (sounds lame but I REALLY needed it and I'm a sucker for [kitchen] appliances/gadgets). But now I am consumption free for another 29-days. Check back to see how it goes.

Tanzeela Ahmad

5 comments:

Wanksta said...

A rolling pin?

Sanjana said...

don't laugh it was a serious NEED. and my momma wouldn't give me hers. why dont you join the non-consumer revolution (no, it won't be televised)?

ecoIslam said...

I completly understand about the rolling pin. I too am a kitchen gadet junkie! I share your pain.

reem said...

you're a nerd.

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